The Voices Reach Out

Home

About Us

Picture Gallery

Video Display

Donation

News & Issues

Helpful Links

Contact Us

Sunday, April 17, 2011
  2011 Nigeria Election: Democracy has finally come to Judgment in Nigeria

Nigerians constitute an important portion of the peoples of African descent worldwide. Some estimate one out of every seven black faces on the face of this planet comes from that country. These statistics are true and the leaders and the led truly believe in the mathematical, moral and political significance of this narrative, then chances are Nigerian would eventually take her rightful place in the in the world. Political maturity and social engineering are inextricably linked to the progress of human society. When human beings demonstrate beyond reasonable doubt that their humanity matters and that they possess concrete and indisputable powers to live with one another and to conduct commercial relationship with one another without difficulties, then chances are such a people are on the highway to peace, tranquility and prosperity. One thing that marks contemporary sense of superiority among the Euro-Western nations is the sense of peace and stability in the conduct of their political wrangles and battles. After having suffered political violence and economic depressions in Europe as well as in America, the West has come to agree in the power of the ball over the bullet. After the fall of Hitler in Germany and the Communists in the former Soviet Union, the power of the electoral process has become supreme. Elections and term limits ate sinking in. Even though the companions of Fidel Castro of Cuba still give lip services to the ideology of communism, it is becoming categorically clear that elections and term limits are almost inevitable. As evidenced in the Middle East, Egypt, Tunisia Libya, and host of others. At this juncture in our history when modernity, globalization and human rights serve as the trinity of human triumph over members of the animal kingdom through their science and technology on the one hand and through their fidelity to scriptures, literature and myth-making powers on the other. Nigerians too are in the race for acceptance and the elections this year provide an important moment for them to demonstrate political maturity and national solidarity in the maintenance of law and order on the one hand and economic acumen and audacity of hope on the other. It is against this background we examine this ongoing campaign and elections. Let us begin with the A, B, and C of the elections this year. The candidacy of Jonathan Goodluck serves as the point of departure in this narrative. Having been chosen as Vice President to the late President Yar Adua, sitting President Goodluck came to office in the midst of serious constitutional debates among Nigerians leaders and their people. Previously trapped in a legal fix of their own creation through the construction of an electoral process widely known as zoning, these leaders thought their political impasse of interethnic wrangles and political confusion could be obviated when the two main regions of the country are given guarantees of passing the political ball from region to region. Under this system of political largesse sharing, many naively thought, the extremism of peoples throughout the land would graduate disappear and Nigeria and her citizens would once again live in peace and the ugly wounds of their long-gone civil war “re becoming things of the past.” Real or imagined, the danger surrounding the zoning debate in which certain elements from the North entertained the idea that the death of Yar Adua should allow another northern to came on this task. This decision was predated by the constitutional question of raising the status of the Vice President to the position of “Acting President.” After much debate and behind-the-scene maneuverings among the leadership, with some foreign prodding from particularly the United States of America, Vice President Goodluck was elevated by the leaders of the national parliament to the status of “Acting President.” It was indeed against this background he made it categorically clear that he was going to rule. Running he did and today, April 20, 2011 the Nigerians and the world are waiting for the electoral commission to tall the votes and declare their results. Atahiru Yacub, the Chief Officer handling the elections, together with fellow Nigerian poll watchers and ball counters will eventually save the Nigerians from political shame and political violence. Will Jonathan win and what will Nigeria gain from his victory? It is this part of the political alphabets of Nigerian society that begs for attention and commentary. Here the potential victory of sitting President Jonathan Goodluck should be looked at in seven different ways of telling the Nigerian story. First of all, this election is a good beginning for teaching younger generations of Nigerians the art of politics. Who governs, when and how? By electing Jonathan Nigerian ethnic majorities such as the Hausa, Yoruba and Igbo could send a reassuring message to the world. If it comes out this way, Nigerian majorities and the respective minorities in the country could tell each other how the Nigerians have also create their own Obama in Jonathan. Once again, a minority candidate after decades of marginalization and exclusion has picked up the baton running for Nigeria in his own right. Those who are not sufficiently informed about the plight of ethnic minorities in Nigeria should take a look at the reports on the Nigerian minorities before independence. Adding insults to injury one must pay attention to the plight of such peoples as events in the Niger Delta. This is the second reason for voting for Jonathan. His triumph would flush out of the sink of neglect all the anxieties and apprehensions of the minorities from the South and the South-South. The third reason why a Jonathan election means another important thing for the Nigerians lies in the implications of his elections for the minorities from the North. Be it noted here that his current Vice President addresses the wishes and hopes of the living minorities in the north. He too would be serving the wishes of the North on the one hand and the hopes and aspirations of the minorities in the northern states of Nigeria. Hopefully, the political combination worked out by Jonathan would heal the nation the way Yacubu Gowan, an Anga by ethnicity from the Tiv land in the former Middle Region of Nigeria did after the bloody civil war. The fourth, fifth, sixth and seven reasons why Jonathan’s election would be a good start for Nigeria, needs to be stated here. In rapid order one could say that a Jonathan presidency could allow the new leaders of Nigeria to embark on the difficult and delicate task of healing the conflicts between the major ethnic groups. Through his cabinet, he can demonstrate beyond reasonable doubt that “Nigeria deserves the best of her intellects and experiences to look after her affairs.” Without putting zoning absolutely in cold storage Jonathan cou

Labels:

 
  2011 Nigeria Election: Democracy has finally come to Judgment in Nigeria
Nigerians constitute an important portion of the peoples of African descent worldwide. Some estimate one out of every seven black faces on the face of this planet comes from that country. These statistics are true and the leaders and the led truly believe in the mathematical, moral and political significance of this narrative, then chances are Nigerian would eventually take her rightful place in the in the world. Political maturity and social engineering are inextricably linked to the progress of human society. When human beings demonstrate beyond reasonable doubt that their humanity matters and that they possess concrete and indisputable powers to live with one another and to conduct commercial relationship with one another without difficulties, then chances are such a people are on the highway to peace, tranquility and prosperity. One thing that marks contemporary sense of superiority among the Euro-Western nations is the sense of peace and stability in the conduct of their political wrangles and battles. After having suffered political violence and economic depressions in Europe as well as in America, the West has come to agree in the power of the ball over the bullet. After the fall of Hitler in Germany and the Communists in the former Soviet Union, the power of the electoral process has become supreme. Elections and term limits ate sinking in. Even though the companions of Fidel Castro of Cuba still give lip services to the ideology of communism, it is becoming categorically clear that elections and term limits are almost inevitable. As evidenced in the Middle East, Egypt, Tunisia Libya, and host of others. At this juncture in our history when modernity, globalization and human rights serve as the trinity of human triumph over members of the animal kingdom through their science and technology on the one hand and through their fidelity to scriptures, literature and myth-making powers on the other. Nigerians too are in the race for acceptance and the elections this year provide an important moment for them to demonstrate political maturity and national solidarity in the maintenance of law and order on the one hand and economic acumen and audacity of hope on the other. It is against this background we examine this ongoing campaign and elections. Let us begin with the A, B, and C of the elections this year. The candidacy of Jonathan Goodluck serves as the point of departure in this narrative. Having been chosen as Vice President to the late President Yar Adua, sitting President Goodluck came to office in the midst of serious constitutional debates among Nigerians leaders and their people. Previously trapped in a legal fix of their own creation through the construction of an electoral process widely known as zoning, these leaders thought their political impasse of interethnic wrangles and political confusion could be obviated when the two main regions of the country are given guarantees of passing the political ball from region to region. Under this system of political largesse sharing, many naively thought, the extremism of peoples throughout the land would graduate disappear and Nigeria and her citizens would once again live in peace and the ugly wounds of their long-gone civil war “re becoming things of the past.” Real or imagined, the danger surrounding the zoning debate in which certain elements from the North entertained the idea that the death of Yar Adua should allow another northern to came on this task. This decision was predated by the constitutional question of raising the status of the Vice President to the position of “Acting President.” After much debate and behind-the-scene maneuverings among the leadership, with some foreign prodding from particularly the United States of America, Vice President Goodluck was elevated by the leaders of the national parliament to the status of “Acting President.” It was indeed against this background he made it categorically clear that he was going to rule. Running he did and today, April 20, 2011 the Nigerians and the world are waiting for the electoral commission to tall the votes and declare their results. Atahiru Yacub, the Chief Officer handling the elections, together with fellow Nigerian poll watchers and ball counters will eventually save the Nigerians from political shame and political violence. Will Jonathan win and what will Nigeria gain from his victory? It is this part of the political alphabets of Nigerian society that begs for attention and commentary. Here the potential victory of sitting President Jonathan Goodluck should be looked at in seven different ways of telling the Nigerian story. First of all, this election is a good beginning for teaching younger generations of Nigerians the art of politics. Who governs, when and how? By electing Jonathan Nigerian ethnic majorities such as the Hausa, Yoruba and Igbo could send a reassuring message to the world. If it comes out this way, Nigerian majorities and the respective minorities in the country could tell each other how the Nigerians have also create their own Obama in Jonathan. Once again, a minority candidate after decades of marginalization and exclusion has picked up the baton running for Nigeria in his own right. Those who are not sufficiently informed about the plight of ethnic minorities in Nigeria should take a look at the reports on the Nigerian minorities before independence. Adding insults to injury one must pay attention to the plight of such peoples as events in the Niger Delta. This is the second reason for voting for Jonathan. His triumph would flush out of the sink of neglect all the anxieties and apprehensions of the minorities from the South and the South-South. The third reason why a Jonathan election means another important thing for the Nigerians lies in the implications of his elections for the minorities from the North. Be it noted here that his current Vice President addresses the wishes and hopes of the living minorities in the north. He too would be serving the wishes of the North on the one hand and the hopes and aspirations of the minorities in the northern states of Nigeria. Hopefully, the political combination worked out by Jonathan would heal the nation the way Yacubu Gowan, an Anga by ethnicity from the Tiv land in the former Middle Region of Nigeria did after the bloody civil war. The fourth, fifth, sixth and seven reasons why Jonathan’s election would be a good start for Nigeria, needs to be stated here. In rapid order one could say that a Jonathan presidency could allow the new leaders of Nigeria to embark on the difficult and delicate task of healing the conflicts between the major ethnic groups. Through his cabinet, he can demonstrate beyond reasonable doubt that “Nigeria deserves the best of her intellects and experiences to look after her affairs.” Without putting zoning absolutely in cold storage Jonathan could make it categorically clear that knowledgeable Nigerians are going to be put as front runners for Nigeria in the global contest. Any evidence along these lines would keep the elders reassured and the youth console for their toil and sacrifices for a better Nigeria. Related to this fourth point is the fifth point about interfaith dialogue in the country. The willingness of former President Buhari to accept the final results of the elections could definitely augur well for the country. He too will enter the pages of Nigeria history as a Nigerian who came to power through the power of the bullet but willingly and seriously accept the dictates of his people. In these narrative future generations of Nigerians, especially those in the Diaspora who followed the events leading to the elections of Barack Obama against Senator McCain can draw a parallel between the defeat of Buhari and McCain in the sense that Obama defeated a war hero who suffered at the hands of the communist Vietnamese whereas Jonathan who served under a Northern civilian President now defeats a former military President who came to power through the power of the bullet. What makes this comparison striking is the fact that when Obama came to the White House history in an ironical and paradoxical way made what was considered at one point impossible now possible. Here we go again; Nigerians are telling the way that defeated former military leaders in the polls bow to the wishes of their electorate. The ball and not the bullet should now prevail. The sixth and seventh points about the victory and election of Jonathan are as follows: Jonathan as a President in his own right is good news for the world. Nigerians are catching up with the train of history. All the foolishness of yesterday belongs to the mistakes and arrogance of leaders and the new direction under him promises the audacity of hope and the willingness of Nigerians to make the best out of this inning in the political cricket of Nigeria. This time, Jonathan should reassure us, he is not going to allow emotionalism and poor judgments to woe and win into the pitch of political errors. If he does so, he will bat his own political wickets. This would be political disaster. It leads me to the seventh point to remember in our analysis of a Jonathan election and victory in Nigeria. Within the end of this year and beyond hopefully Jonathan and his team would create new pathways for Nigerians. The much needed changes are begging for attention and hopefully through a new political culture the people of this “Giant of Africa” would wake up and collect their senses to take their rightful place in world history. They should start with what they know and build on what they have.

Labels:

 
  2011 Nigeria Election: Democracy has finally come to Judgment in Nigeria
By Eucvharia Mbachu Nigerians constitute an important portion of the peoples of African descent worldwide. Some estimate one out of every seven black faces on the face of this planet comes from that country. These statistics are true and the leaders and the led truly believe in the mathematical, moral and political significance of this narrative, then chances are Nigerian would eventually take her rightful place in the in the world. Political maturity and social engineering are inextricably linked to the progress of human society. When human beings demonstrate beyond reasonable doubt that their humanity matters and that they possess concrete and indisputable powers to live with one another and to conduct commercial relationship with one another without difficulties, then chances are such a people are on the highway to peace, tranquility and prosperity. One thing that marks contemporary sense of superiority among the Euro-Western nations is the sense of peace and stability in the conduct of their political wrangles and battles. After having suffered political violence and economic depressions in Europe as well as in America, the West has come to agree in the power of the ball over the bullet. After the fall of Hitler in Germany and the Communists in the former Soviet Union, the power of the electoral process has become supreme. Elections and term limits ate sinking in. Even though the companions of Fidel Castro of Cuba still give lip services to the ideology of communism, it is becoming categorically clear that elections and term limits are almost inevitable. As evidenced in the Middle East, Egypt, Tunisia Libya, and host of others. At this juncture in our history when modernity, globalization and human rights serve as the trinity of human triumph over members of the animal kingdom through their science and technology on the one hand and through their fidelity to scriptures, literature and myth-making powers on the other. Nigerians too are in the race for acceptance and the elections this year provide an important moment for them to demonstrate political maturity and national solidarity in the maintenance of law and order on the one hand and economic acumen and audacity of hope on the other. It is against this background we examine this ongoing campaign and elections. Let us begin with the A, B, and C of the elections this year. The candidacy of Jonathan Goodluck serves as the point of departure in this narrative. Having been chosen as Vice President to the late President Yar Adua, sitting President Goodluck came to office in the midst of serious constitutional debates among Nigerians leaders and their people. Previously trapped in a legal fix of their own creation through the construction of an electoral process widely known as zoning, these leaders thought their political impasse of interethnic wrangles and political confusion could be obviated when the two main regions of the country are given guarantees of passing the political ball from region to region. Under this system of political largesse sharing, many naively thought, the extremism of peoples throughout the land would graduate disappear and Nigeria and her citizens would once again live in peace and the ugly wounds of their long-gone civil war “re becoming things of the past.” Real or imagined, the danger surrounding the zoning debate in which certain elements from the North entertained the idea that the death of Yar Adua should allow another northern to came on this task. This decision was predated by the constitutional question of raising the status of the Vice President to the position of “Acting President.” After much debate and behind-the-scene maneuverings among the leadership, with some foreign prodding from particularly the United States of America, Vice President Goodluck was elevated by the leaders of the national parliament to the status of “Acting President.” It was indeed against this background he made it categorically clear that he was going to rule. Running he did and today, April 20, 2011 the Nigerians and the world are waiting for the electoral commission to tall the votes and declare their results. Atahiru Yacub, the Chief Officer handling the elections, together with fellow Nigerian poll watchers and ball counters will eventually save the Nigerians from political shame and political violence. Will Jonathan win and what will Nigeria gain from his victory? It is this part of the political alphabets of Nigerian society that begs for attention and commentary. Here the potential victory of sitting President Jonathan Goodluck should be looked at in seven different ways of telling the Nigerian story. First of all, this election is a good beginning for teaching younger generations of Nigerians the art of politics. Who governs, when and how? By electing Jonathan Nigerian ethnic majorities such as the Hausa, Yoruba and Igbo could send a reassuring message to the world. If it comes out this way, Nigerian majorities and the respective minorities in the country could tell each other how the Nigerians have also create their own Obama in Jonathan. Once again, a minority candidate after decades of marginalization and exclusion has picked up the baton running for Nigeria in his own right. Those who are not sufficiently informed about the plight of ethnic minorities in Nigeria should take a look at the reports on the Nigerian minorities before independence. Adding insults to injury one must pay attention to the plight of such peoples as events in the Niger Delta. This is the second reason for voting for Jonathan. His triumph would flush out of the sink of neglect all the anxieties and apprehensions of the minorities from the South and the South-South. The third reason why a Jonathan election means another important thing for the Nigerians lies in the implications of his elections for the minorities from the North. Be it noted here that his current Vice President addresses the wishes and hopes of the living minorities in the north. He too would be serving the wishes of the North on the one hand and the hopes and aspirations of the minorities in the northern states of Nigeria. Hopefully, the political combination worked out by Jonathan would heal the nation the way Yacubu Gowan, an Anga by ethnicity from the Tiv land in the former Middle Region of Nigeria did after the bloody civil war. The fourth, fifth, sixth and seven reasons why Jonathan’s election would be a good start for Nigeria, needs to be stated here. In rapid order one could say that a Jonathan presidency could allow the new leaders of Nigeria to embark on the difficult and delicate task of healing the conflicts between the major ethnic groups. Through his cabinet, he can demonstrate beyond reasonable doubt that “Nigeria deserves the best of her intellects and experiences to look after her affairs.” Without putting zoning absolutely in cold storage Jonathan could make it categorically clear that knowledgeable Nigerians are going to be put as front runners for Nigeria in the global contest. Any evidence along these lines would keep the elders reassured and the youth console for their toil and sacrifices for a better Nigeria. Related to this fourth point is the fifth point about interfaith dialogue in the country. The willingness of former President Buhari to accept the final results of the elections could definitely augur well for the country. He too will enter the pages of Nigeria history as a Nigerian who came to power through the power of the bullet but willingly and seriously accept the dictates of his people. In these narrative future generations of Nigerians, especially those in the Diaspora who followed the events leading to the elections of Barack Obama against Senator McCain can draw a parallel between the defeat of Buhari and McCain in the sense that Obama defeated a war hero who suffered at the hands of the communist Vietnamese whereas Jonathan who served under a Northern civilian President now defeats a former military President who came to power through the power of the bullet. What makes this comparison striking is the fact that when Obama came to the White House history in an ironical and paradoxical way made what was considered at one point impossible now possible. Here we go again; Nigerians are telling the way that defeated former military leaders in the polls bow to the wishes of their electorate. The ball and not the bullet should now prevail. The sixth and seventh points about the victory and election of Jonathan are as follows: Jonathan as a President in his own right is good news for the world. Nigerians are catching up with the train of history. All the foolishness of yesterday belongs to the mistakes and arrogance of leaders and the new direction under him promises the audacity of hope and the willingness of Nigerians to make the best out of this inning in the political cricket of Nigeria. This time, Jonathan should reassure us, he is not going to allow emotionalism and poor judgments to woe and win into the pitch of political errors. If he does so, he will bat his own political wickets. This would be political disaster. It leads me to the seventh point to remember in our analysis of a Jonathan election and victory in Nigeria. Within the end of this year and beyond hopefully Jonathan and his team would create new pathways for Nigerians. The much needed changes are begging for attention and hopefully through a new political culture the people of this “Giant of Africa” would wake up and collect their senses to take their rightful place in world history. They should start with what they know and build on what they have.
 
Saturday, April 2, 2011
  The Need for Political Maturity in Nigerian. By Eucharia Mbachu

Nigeria has had its share of political instability; thank goodness things are shaping up for the better. However as Nigerians are preped up to go to the pools, every meaningful Nigerian is compelled by circumstances to hold his or her breath. Because of the size of the country a lot is expected from its leaders as the biblical saying goes, he whom much is given, much is expected. That is why most Nigerians carry the biggest weight both in Africa and other parts of the world when black performance is judged in the field of human development Nigeria comes to mind Going to the polls has emerged as one of the bones of contention that defines and determines the status and significance of any independent member of the United Nations. Since the declaration of independence in the majority of African countries in the ninety sixties, elections were considered the prelude to nationhood. Almost all the leaders who assumed power at this time in African history joined the UN as victors in their last elections before decolonization came into being. These founding fathers of the New Africa bragged about their performances at the polls. However, from the wider perspective of history, many of these leaders failed to honor and respect the acts of dignification conferred upon them at polling times. Instead of ruling for a short time and yield back power to their constituencies, they linked on and in the end suffered the fates of dictators who stayed too long. If not booted out through the ballot boxes, they were driven out of power by mad and hungry soldiers. Hence the first ten years after Ghana’s pioneering role as independent that country was a disaster for all Africans and blacks around the world. Coups detat came in rapid succession and elections gradually became the distant source of power. One –Party dictatorship became fashionable and coups detat became the alternative ways of sharing power among soldiers. Under the one-party dictatorship, civilians rule; under the military certain collaborating civilians got some little power as co-opted fellows of the ruling elites. . Nigeria provides an excellent case study of Africa’s encounter with elections. There are five ways in which the forthcoming elections separate the Nigerian road to democracy from others on the continent. First, Nigerians are similar to but different from other Africans in the sense that, on the one hand, they yearn for the ballot box, but on the other, they know the growing pain in getting their soldiers and civilian leaders to accept the demands of term limits and the need for political tolerance among the elites. Without political tolerance there will be little or no change after the elections. Either the electorate may feel disappointed or cajoled by deceptive politicians or the emotions may take over and the people might decide to follow their ethnic urges instead of their rational political and economic interests. Another way Nigerians are different from the other Africans stems from the demographic imperatives. With a population of almost one-half of the United States of America Nigeria caters to a large electorate and for this and other related reasons, it was impossible for either the civilians or the soldiers to impose a one-party state. Historically speaking, General Ironsi was a victim of this miscalculation when he declared Nigeria a unitary state after the 1965 coup detat The same circumstances made it impossible for both the two former military dictators Ibrahim Babangida and Sani Abacha to mold the country according to their taste. The third point to make here rests on the circumstances that led to the rise of General Olusegun Obasanjo. One cannot appreciate the successes of the former President unless one looks at Nigerian elections in the circumstances and the political agitation of the Nigerian electorates and civil societies that brought him to power. Not only did he benefit from the rise and death of the late M.O.K. Abiola under very depressing and dangerous period, but he also contributed immeasurably to the harnessing of the special Nigerian political seeds to help advance Nigerians to the present level of political maturity. General Obasanjo may have his critics galore in the country, but the fact still remains to be said. It was during his leadership that a new generation of cooperating elites across ethnic lines began to form forcefully and nationally. Posterity will eventually know all the secret details about his successes in governing the country through an effective alliance between northern leaders and their counterparts in the southern parts of the country at such a critical moment. Those who are in the know can vouch for the great Obansanjo fascination with the candidacy of the late former President Yar Adua. The former President Obasanjo campaigned vigorously for the brother of his former colleague, senior Yar Adua during the fatal and bloody times of Abacha who contributed a great deal when younger Obasanjo took power after the assassination of Murtala Mohammed. He made sure also that he ruled with full party support. When we look at the fourth and fifth reasons why these forthcoming elections make Nigeria a different political space in Africa, three elements demand serious thought. There is the fact that during these elections, Nigerians will have more than two credible political parties and both of them, if enthusiastically voted for by the vast majority of the population, would raise the levels of political maturity in the country. Whosoever is elected would be privileged to govern with minimal tensions in the country. The second element, if things work out amicably, would be the growing decline of the significance of zoning. If the leaders in the country have learned to cooperate with Obasanjo’s successors after he was denied a third term, then we can here argue for a new passion for change in Nigerian political arithmetic and a new attitude towards civilian and military rulers. Here the fifth reason for Nigerians to look at the forthcoming elections critically lies in the opportunities for the larger ethnic groups to come together and demonstrate political maturity by choosing the best candidate. If the evidence suggest for them, as matters did for Americans during their elections of 2008 when Barrack Obama won, then the sitting President Jonathan is qualified to rule. Significantly, the whole process would be dignified by the competition of former President Buhari on the one hand and Presidential candidate Ribadu, on the other. Drawing a parallel with the 2008 American elections, one could now say honestly that General Buhari would be serving historically the same role as Senator McCain in the American elections. If the electorate across the great ethnic divide in the country favors President Jonathan, then chances are the zoning question will be fixed for all Nigerians. Truth be told, the participation of both northern politicians in this campaign could send a positive message to the country that the minorities deserve to be consoled by such acts of political unity and solidarity among the larger Nigerian ethnic groups who see this moment as a saving grace and a new salute to all Nigerians at home and abroad. It is in light of this, that we now turn to the elections and their significance for Nigerian political maturity. By political maturity one means the development of serious consciousness among the Nigerian electorate to stay away from political violence and thuggery during elections. If the political elites accept the ballot box as the instrument of the people to choose and select leaders, chances are Nigerians will gradually eliminate the corrupting powers of bad elections and political demagoguery. During these elections Nigerians are being asked to elect their new President and Vice President; they are challenge to elect new governors as well as new leaders of government in various levels of the federation and thirty-six constituting states. However, there are stumbling blocks that might likely work against the meaningful and effective conduct of elections. First of all, many Nigerians are mindful of the dangers that lay hidden from public view. There is apprehension about political intrigues and the rigging of elections on the side of one party or the other. Such approaches to politics under the present conditions in Nigeria are dangerous and unwise. If not avoided, chances of bloodshed and political chaos could set in. The only people who can avoid these eventualities are the political elites from all parts of the country. So long as the various states are able to elect their own governors unimpeded chances are Abuja would gradually become the haven of political compromise and national celebration. I will leave my readers with what we learned from the history of elections in Nigeria since decolonization. There was the politics of hope and expectation during the last days of colonialism and many of our leaders and elders enjoyed the arts of politicking. However, this love affair with political electioneering was short-lived, largely because of the political violence in the country. Since then political freedom was caught and mortgaged by military leaders through coup detats. Another factor to be considered is the nature of the Nigerian political animal. It is too big to be tamed under one-party domination. Nigeria never had one-party rule and their political developments revolved around civilian versus military rulers. It is very important to note the chemistry of Nigerian politics. Nigerians are allergic to political ideologies unlike other places in the world. Their intolerance for long-term dictatorship has made their electoral process a tough bargain for politicians. It is too costly to meet with the political demanding of the voters on the one hand, and to negotiate successfully with political rivals on the other, This is particularly so now, when bargaining and compromise are fully accepted as terms of reference in the political culture of the country. In light of this reasoning one is compelled to say these unforgettable words from one African thinker:: “Nigeria’s destiny is inextricably linked to the personal egos of every citizens who is sufficiently informed to use his or her voting power as a to effect positive change in the country from the leaders to restrain from the ugly thoughts and nefarious deeds that are bound to shame our national honor. It will be a disaster if democracy falls in Nigeria. What happened in Rwanda will be a child’s cry compared to what will happen if Nigeria fall short in her quest for democracy. That’s why it’s imperative that a serious caution be maintained both at the voting pools and outside. Hopefully, this election will be a critical test and our success after the voting could open the doors to social, economic and political developments which will clearly confirms that Nigeria as a partner in progress on international economic powerhouse.

Labels:

 

My Photo
Name:
Location: United States

You

Archives
December 2007 / January 2008 / March 2008 / May 2009 / June 2009 / August 2009 / November 2009 / January 2010 / February 2010 / March 2010 / April 2011 / May 2011 / January 2012 /


Powered by Blogger

Subscribe to
Posts [Atom]

 
© 2007 Voices of Women & Children
P.O. Box 8616 Silver Spring, MD 20910 • Telephone 301-562-1418 • webmaster@vowac.org